February 1, 2023

2. Charles carries his childhood teddy bear with him

Replacement focuses on the damage that royal life and “elegant captivity” have caused Harry throughout his life since the death of his 37-year-old mother Diana in 1997.

But we see bits and pieces of the suffering and trauma inflicted on Charles by the way he was brought up, and in particular when he was sent as a child to Gordonstoun boarding school, where he was bullied.

Harry remembers that Charles told him that he had been “chased” by the other children, that he “barely made it”, and that his father had relied on a teddy bear to get him through it all.

He says that Charles still owns that stuffed animal.

“Teddy went everywhere with Pa. He was a pitiful thing, arms broken and strings dangling, holes patched here and there,” Harry writes.

“He looked, I imagined, like Dad would have done after the bullies had finished with him. Teddy eloquently expressed, better than Dad ever could, the essential loneliness of his childhood.

King Charles, then Prince of Wales, receives a new teddy bear from German President Frank-Walter Steinmeier at Bellevue Castle in Berlin in 2019.Credit:access point

3. Charles loves music and particularly the classical composer Beethoven

Charles loves music and plays it on a portable CD player which he calls “wireless”, according to Harry.

Prince Charles, a lover of classical music, plays the cello in 1988.Credit:International Syndication/Archives

Just how much Charles loves music wasn’t apparent to Harry until recently, when he brought his then-wife-to-be Meghan over to Charles and Camilla’s house to catch up.

Charles and Meghan bonded over their love of music, and classical music in particular. Meghan loves Frédéric Chopin, while Charles’s favorite classical composer is Ludwig Beethoven.

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4. Charles does a headstand wearing only boxers

Harry says that Charles suffers from constant back and neck pain from old polo sports injuries.

We learn this detail early on in Harry’s memoirs when he recounts summer vacations at Balmoral with his grandmother, the late Queen Elizabeth II.

According to Harry, the King’s physiotherapist prescribed him to perform headstands as a way of relieving pain.

“I staged them every day, in just a pair of boxer shorts, leaning against a door or hanging from a bar like a skilled acrobat,” he writes.

This led to constant fears of accidentally stepping into it while performing the exercises.

4. Charles has an Australian chef

Harry often talks about eating food prepared by “Pa’s” chef as he recounts his lonely bachelorhood living first with his father and now Queen Consort Camilla, then alone in an apartment and finally at Nottingham Cottage in the grounds of Kensington Palace.

He talks about wearing a costume and hitting the local supermarket for groceries to make his own meal. He memorized the layout of the supermarket so he could do all his shopping in 10 minutes and minimize the risk of being seen by photographers.

But on a few occasions his father’s chef would prepare meals for him and send them to him. We later found out that Charles’s chef is Australian. More proof of the monarch’s good taste?

5. Charles loves Shakespeare but laughs in all the wrong places.

There is a lovely passage in Replacement when Harry contrasts his own interests with those of his father. They are practically total opposites.

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Bard-fan Charles, center, applauds a performance at the Royal Shakespeare Company, in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, in 2020.

Bard-fan Charles, center, applauds a performance at the Royal Shakespeare Company, in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, in 2020.Credit:access point

“Dad not only enjoyed books, he exalted them. Especially Shakespeare. he he he adored Henry V. He compared himself to Prince Hal,” Harry recalls.

Charles loves Shakespeare so much that he gives a lecture peppered with quotations from the bard’s works and takes Harry to performances in Stratford.

He urged Harry to read Village but Harry didn’t like the idea.

“Hmm: Lone prince, obsessed with dead father, watches the remaining father fall in love with the dead father’s usurper…? I slammed it shut. No thanks,” Harry writes.

But Harry is pleased when they cast him Much ado About Nothing at Eton and Charles turns up to see the performance.

“On opening night, my father sat in the center of a packed Farrer Theater and no one had a better time. Here he was, his dream come true, a son playing Shakespeare, and he was getting money’s worth from it.

“He yelled, he howled, he clapped. But, inexplicably, at all the wrong times,” Harry recalls.

Harry writes that Charles later praises his “darling boy” as wonderful, telling him that he laughed at the wrong times.

Charles tells Harry that his own father, Prince Philip, showed up and did the same at his Shakespeare performance.

7. He seems to like his cologne too much.

Charles loves fragrances, but according to Harry, he wears too much of his favorite fragrance. saltwater from Dior.

8. He prefers letters to phone calls

When Harry was in the military and serving in Afghanistan, he used his precious calls home on the satellite phone to call his then-girlfriend Chelsea, whom he called Chels, and her father.

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Prince Harry, or simply Captain Wales as he is known in the British Army, wears his monocle as he sits in the front seat of his cabin on the British-controlled flight line at Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan. .

Prince Harry, or simply Captain Wales as he is known in the British Army, wears his monocle as he sits in the front seat of his cabin on the British-controlled flight line at Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan. .Credit:access point

But Charles finally tells her that he prefers letters to phone calls.

“He asked me to write instead of calling. He loved my letters. She said she would prefer a letter,” Harry writes.

Charles also returns the favor. Elsewhere in the book, Harry talks about Charles’s struggle to communicate with him verbally, but how he would go to bed and find a note under his pillow written by his father telling him how proud he was of his achievements. .

9. He is a workaholic and often falls asleep at his desk.

According to Harry, Charles continually upholds the virtues of work and would stay at his desk burning midnight oil dealing with all his mail.

“His own job was also a kind of religion because he was furiously trying to save the planet,” Harry writes.

Countless times, late at night, Willy and I would find it as his desk amid mountains of bulging blue mailbags: his correspondence.

“More than once we discovered him, face on the desk, fast asleep. We would shake his shoulders and he would sway, with a piece of paper stuck to his forehead,” Harry recalls.

Prince Harrry writes that he lived with his father Charles and stepmother Camilla before they moved.

Prince Harrry writes that he lived with his father Charles and stepmother Camilla before they moved.Credit:access point

10. Charles didn’t reprimand Harry for the incidents with the Nazis and the strippers.

You’d think being criticized by the press for wearing a Nazi costume to a costume party might earn you a daddy smack over the knuckles, and again for allowing “dubious casino callers” to be photographed playing a round of pool.

London newsstand Roy Ottoway reads a copy of 'The Sun' tabloid, whose front page shows Prince Harry dressed in a Nazi soldier's uniform at a costume party in 2005.

London newsstand Roy Ottoway reads a copy of ‘The Sun’ tabloid, whose front page shows Prince Harry dressed in a Nazi soldier’s uniform at a costume party in 2005.Credit:access point

But Harry says that Charles was sympathetic to both incidents when they occurred and said that the youngsters made mistakes.

“To my surprise and relief, he was gentle. Even puzzled. I had felt, she said, I had been there.

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