January 28, 2023

A gay Norwegian filmmaker faces three years in prison after she said male-to-female transgender women cannot be lesbians.

Tonje Gjevjon spoke out against transgender activist Christine Jentoft, who has ceased to be a man and now identifies as a “lesbian mother.”

“It’s just as impossible for men to become lesbians as it is for them to get pregnant,” Gjevjon wrote in Facebook in October. ‘Men are men regardless of their sexual fetishes.’

Gjevjon is now under police investigation and faces up to three years in jail for his public comments after Norway’s parliament banned hate speech against transgender people in 2020.

Tonje Gjevjon (pictured) spoke out against transgender activist Christine Jentoft, a transgender woman who stopped being a man and now identifies as a “lesbian mother.”

“It’s just as impossible for men to become lesbians as it is for them to get pregnant,” Gjevjon wrote on Facebook in October. ‘Men are men regardless of their sexual fetishes’

Norway expanded its penal code, which has protected gay and lesbian people since 1981, to include transgender people two years ago.

Gjevjon, who is also an artist, said Reduxx His Facebook post was made to draw attention to Norway’s reform of hate speech law, adding that trans activists have tried to shut down his art shows because of his views.

She wrote in an essay in the Norwegian newspaper Klassekampen: “I have declared that women are women, that lesbians do not have penises, that boys should not be responsible for decisions for which they do not have the capacity to understand the scope, and no- platforms are harmful to democracy.

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‘For these opinions I have been canceled several times.’

Gjevjon said she has been ‘demonized’ by trans activists and politicians for her views.

She wrote in the newspaper: ‘I was not prepared for the scope of how queer organisations, politicians and activists would demonize a lesbian artist who was out of step.

“Trans activists contact the people I work with, portraying me as hateful and warning them not to associate with me.”

Gjevjon (pictured) is now under police investigation and faces up to three years in jail for his public comments after Norway's parliament banned hate speech against transgender people in 2020.

Gjevjon (pictured) is now under police investigation and faces up to three years in jail for his public comments after Norway's parliament banned hate speech against transgender people in 2020.

Gjevjon (pictured) is now under police investigation and faces up to three years in jail for his public comments after Norway’s parliament banned hate speech against transgender people in 2020.

In Norway, the parliament banned hate speech against transgender people in 2020.

People found guilty of hate speech face a fine or up to a year in jail for private comments, and a maximum of three years in jail for public comments, depending on the penal code.

Norway is one of the most liberal countries in Europe for LGBT+ people, allowing transgender people to legally change their gender without a medical diagnosis in 2016.

Trans people are “an exposed group when it comes to discrimination, harassment and violence,” Justice and Public Safety Minister Monica Maeland said after the law was passed in 2020.

‘It is imperative that the protection against discrimination offered by criminal law be adapted to the practical situations that arise,’ he said.

The 2020 amendments outlawed discrimination based on “gender identity or gender expression” and changed “homosexual orientation” to “sexual orientation,” meaning bisexual, lesbian, and gay people will be explicitly protected from discrimination. .

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Under the penal code, people charged with violent crimes can receive harsher sentences if a judge decides that their actions were motivated by someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

Opponents of the law argued that it could criminalize free speech criticizing LGBT+ rights, Anine Kierulf, an assistant professor of law at the University of Oslo, said at the time.