January 28, 2023

A British hippie couple accused of using mind-blowing drugs in shamanic healing sessions without a license have been arrested in Spain.

The couple, a 47-year-old man and a 52-year-old woman, were being held on a rural property in Yecla, near the southeastern city of Murcia.

Detectives say they offered their services online, providing accommodation for up to 16 paying guests at a time and organizing rituals involving ‘hazardous substances’ without health checks, including magic mushrooms, ayahuasca and Sananga, which is used by some tribes in the Amazon region to sharpen Night Vision.

They made the arrests after interrupting a ‘healing session’ for seven people of different nationalities.

A British hippie couple accused of using mind-blowing drugs in shamanic healing sessions without a license have been arrested in Spain. In the image: police raid on the property.

Several goldfinch wings were also found on the property even though the goldfinch is a protected species.

The British couple has not been named.

A spokesperson for the Civil Guard in Murcia has confirmed: ‘The Civil Guard, in the framework of an operation called Kambo, has arrested two people who were recruiting clients for supposed shamanic healing sessions.

“They are a 47-year-old British man and a 52-year-old woman.

“A series of harmful substances have been seized that were being administered without any sanitary control to Spaniards and people from other European countries.

The couple, a 47-year-old man and a 52-year-old woman, were held at a rural property in Yecla, near the southeastern city of Murcia, and allegedly found drugs on the property.

The couple, a 47-year-old man and a 52-year-old woman, were held at a rural property in Yecla, near the southeastern city of Murcia, and allegedly found drugs on the property.

Several goldfinch wings were also found on the property even though the goldfinch is a protected species.

Several goldfinch wings were also found on the property even though the goldfinch is a protected species.

‘The British couple offered their services online with promotional material advertising their rural property as a self-help group-oriented healing home and things like addiction detox.

“They had no license or authorization. Despite this, they were charging individuals £40 per night for minimum stays of three nights, with group deals of £450 per day for 16 guests.

In May last year, Spanish police raided a luxury villa on the Costa del Sol after a British tourist claimed he had been offered ayahuasca when he complained about his accommodation.

The tourist told detectives that he was invited to “chill out” by drinking the hallucinogenic concoction after discovering that he was expected to share a room with strangers.

Police discovered that an illegal party with 40 people was taking place at the villa in the luxury Marbella resort when they went to investigate.

Drugs allegedly found include magic mushrooms, ayahuasca and Sananga, which is used by some tribes in the Amazon region to sharpen night vision.

Drugs allegedly found include magic mushrooms, ayahuasca and Sananga, which is used by some tribes in the Amazon region to sharpen night vision.

Detectives say they offered their services online, providing lodging for up to 16 paying guests at a time.

Detectives say they offered their services online, providing lodging for up to 16 paying guests at a time.

The operation ended when police arrested the party organizer when she allegedly kicked an officer after refusing to hand over identification and bit another in the chest.

In September 2018, a British accountant identified as 31-year-old Aaron Kilburn was charged with selling £500 weekend retreats to Spain, where guests were given ayahuasca to drink.

A UK Sunday newspaper report said clients of Ayahuasca English, the company Kilburn ran, were taken to a large villa in Marbella for a three-day retreat costing £560 where they participated in ayahuasca sessions from the entire night and ‘psychotherapeutic integration’.

Nicknamed ‘little death’, the potent psychoactive drug is often drunk during tribal rituals in the Amazon jungle by Westerners who have been promised ‘spiritual enlightenment’.

A number of celebrities including Sting, Paul Simon and Lindsay Lohan are said to have endorsed the class A drug, a mixture of the ayahuasca vine and a shrub called chacruna.

In August 2019, an investigation concluded that the drug contributed to the death of Bristol gap year student Henry Miller after he drank the substance during a ritual in Colombia in 2014.

In 2015, Unais Gomes, 26, a Cambridge graduate and former Goldman Sachs banker, died after taking ayahuasca. He was stabbed to death by a friend who said he was acting in self-defense after the couple got into a violent fight at a retreat in Peru.